Lorraine Hansberry, showed readers how Walter lee younger matured into a man

People eventually mature as time passes on and events occur in their lives. The rate of their maturity is also affected by their attitudes and view on life. Lorraine Hansberry, showed readers how Walter lee younger matured into a man. Walter has changed through the story as an immature, idealistic brat to a responsible and un-materialistic young man, through events and circumstances throughout the play. In the beginning, Walter talked about his dreams. Walter was rather materialistic and had no regard for his family.

Walter stated,” Yeah you see this little liquor store we got in mind cost seventy-five thousand dollars… othing happen for you in this world ‘less you pay somebody off… Man says I got a dream. “(Hansberry pg. 11). Walter dreams of owning a liquor store, but with out the support of his wife he becomes angry and makes fun of her, in an immature childish way. Moreover, Walter thinks only of himself and possessions. He thinks of he might have proving that he is small-minded. Walter’s previous actions have obviously left his wife in doubt. Unmoved by his new dream, Ruth reacts by telling Walter, “Honey you never say something new… ” (Hansberry pg. 12).

Walter is idealistic, but can no longer back up his dreams. Through his actions he has lost respect from his family. Walter hasn’t tried to comfort any of his members; instead, he is selfish and thinks only of his goals. Walter is a money-oriented person, and can no longer see the light, since he has fallen so deep into his own well-being and finical problems. Later on in the story, Walter matures into a responsible young man who is considerate of other people and is prideful. Walter denies the money offered by Mr. Linder and also tells him, “We are very plain people. ” (Hansberry pg. 94).

Walter is no longer materialistic. He would rather live in a plain house than receive the money. Walter also cares for hi family. Walter made the decision that would benefit them most. Mama confirms Walter’s decision to Mr. Linder, and later states, “He finally came into his man-hood. ” (Hansberry pg. 102). It seems that Walter has grown into a young man capable of leading his family. He no longer cares for only himself. Walter has also earned the respect of his mother at the end of the story. Walter grew a great deal during the duration of the play, and no longer behaves as an immature brat.

Walter changed from a concede person to one who thinks more than one step ahead. Walter matured throughout the play thought the obstacles he had to overcome. Walter has matured like many other people do in their lifetime. People will not be children forever. We must either mature or perish. Without maturity, people may never have advanced this far in life. Walter showed use that without the right train of thought, our goals will never be accomplished and they will remain sketches on our elaborate pad, and never into pieces of art.

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